Ocnus.Net
News Before It's News
About us | Ocnus? |

Front Page 
 
 Africa
 
 Analyses
 
 Business
 
 Dark Side
 
 Defence & Arms
 
 Dysfunctions
 
 Editorial
 
 International
 
 Labour
 
 Light Side
 
 Research
Search

Africa Last Updated: Mar 7, 2018 - 3:37:05 PM


After 34 years, Angola and DRC resume rail links
By FurtherAfrica, March 7, 2018
Mar 7, 2018 - 3:36:04 PM

Email this article
 Printer friendly page

Rail traffic between the Democratic Republic of Congo and its neighbour Angola has resumed after a 34-year break, providing a vital boost for DRC’s mining exports, officials said.

“The first train left DRC on Monday hauling 50 containers and arrived at Luau station in Moxico province” in eastern Angola, the Congolese presidency said on Tuesday.

The train, which left from the border town of Dilolo in southeastern DRC, is heading for the Angolan port of Lobito, on the Atlantic coast, it said.

Ikos Rukal, spokesperson for the provincial government of Lualaba, where Dilolo is located, said the 1 300km Dilolo-Lobito route was “the most cost-effective form of transport” for exporting copper and cobalt from DRC’s southern mining belt.

The line was closed during the height of the 1975-2002 Angolan civil war and remained in disuse afterwards because equipment and track had deteriorated.

The line between Lobito and Luau was rebuilt by the China Railway Construction Corporation, and was formally inaugurated in February 2015.

In the absence of the link to the Atlantic, DRC’s mineral ore was exported by truck via Zambia – a 900km trek on poor roads that greatly increased shipping costs and time.


Source:Ocnus.net 2018

Top of Page

Africa
Latest Headlines
What Kenya can do to ensure local people benefit from its oil industry
EUTM Mali’s problematic strategy – more rebuilding rather than fielding an army
Cameroon on brink of civil war as English speakers recount ‘unbearable’ horrors
War in Cameroon
African transport infrastructure insufficient for continental growth
Congo: Where Chaos Is King
Algeria: Turmoil And Churn At The Top
Trafigura Group helps re-establish historic African trade route
No child soldiers: The next steps in Central African Republic
Lourenço’s First Year: Angola’s Transitional Politics