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Light Side Last Updated: Feb 22, 2017 - 10:57:43 AM


Stephen Colbert Explains Why Trump Is More Of A Bite-Size Dictator
By Bill Bradley, Huffington 21/2/17
Feb 22, 2017 - 10:56:17 AM

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Donald Trump is apparently putting the “tater” in dictator.

Stephen Colbert slammed President Trump on Monday’s “Late Show” for his recent tweet calling various news organizations “the enemy of the American People.”

”Sorry, ISIS,” said Colbert. “If you want to get on the list, you gotta publish photos of Trump’s inauguration crowd. Then he’ll be really, really angry at you.”

Colbert pointed out how Senator John McCain criticized the comments, saying that you need a “free and many times adversarial press” to preserve democracy.

“Without it, I’m afraid that we would lose so much of our individual liberties over time. That’s how dictators get started,” said McCain.

That sounds bigly scary, but Colbert helped explain McCain’s comment.

“Just to be clear, he’s not saying Trump is a dictator. He’s saying getting rid of the free press is how dictators get started, OK? He’s not calling him a full dictator. He’s more bite-size. He’s a dictator-tot,” said Colbert.

 

https://youtu.be/KzKiSoSn9qA


Source:Ocnus.net 2017

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